Institute for Global Studies
214 Social Sciences
267 19th Ave S
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Phone: 612-624-9007
Fax: 612-626-2242
E-mail: igs@umn.edu

Professional Development Programs

Professional development opportunities encourage educators to explore current issues in international studies through conferences, seminars, short courses and faculty presentations.

Workshops and institutes challenge teachers to combine experience in applying critical thinking and problem-solving skills to international issues with the knowledge and materials needed to engage their students. To prepare our students for global citizenship in the 21st Century, the Institute for Global Studies and the European Studies Consortium are working to strengthen international studies in K-16 education.

The Teacher Summer Institutes combine lectures by University of Minnesota faculty and guest speakers, small group discussions, course readings, fieldtrips and teaching resources to explore international issues and learn strategies for integrating global topics into existing curriculum. The Summer Institutes are funded by a Title VI grant from US Department of Education.

The Institute for Global Studies professional development for educators addresses the following global competencies (as defined by the United States Department of Education) that students gain through disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies:

  • Students investigate the world beyond their immediate environment.
  • Students recognize their own and others' perspectives.
  • Students communicate their ideas effectively with diverse audiences.
  • Students translate their ideas into appropriate actions to improve conditions.

 

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Spring 2014 Workshops for Educators

Beyond Iberian Colonialisms: Spanish and Arabs and the Fate of the Western Sahara Educator Workshop

Date:  April 5, 2014, 9:00am-2:00, Nolte 125, East Bank U of MN
Instructors:Bahia Awah , Limam Boicha, Drs William Vistenz Michelle Hamilton Spanish and Portuguese, UMN

Cost: $25 includes parking, resources, 5 CEUS, lunch and book by one of the authors

Registration deadline: March 22, 2014  Register Here

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:If you need to cancel, write to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.eduby March 22, 2014. If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

While most people associate Spanish with Spain and Latin America, fewer realize that it was the language of Spain’s colony in North Africa. Today, Saharans born and educated in the Spanish colony of the Western Sahara and living in Spain and Latin America, write poetry and short stories in Castilian to describe the past and present realities of life in the Saharan desert—the life of nomadic Arabs embroiled in the politics of the Middle East. Educators attending this workshop will have the opportunity to work collaboratively with poet Bahia Awah (Bahia Mahmud Hamadi) and poet Limam Oumar Boicha  on exploring the histories of Iberian colonialisms with the present realities of African Immigration and cultural production.  Lesson plans will be shared as well as other teaching resources.  Workshop will be conducted in Spanish and English.

Bahia Awah is a Saharan writer, poet and journalist living in Spain. He is the author of numerous books of poetry, short stories and memoires. He also maintains  the Saharan Culture blog in the leading Spanish newspaper, El País. He has worked tirelessly over the last decades to bring attention to the cultural production of Spanish-speaking Saharans from Spain’s former colony in North Africa, whose culture reflects both the nostalgia of European colonialism and the realities of contemporary African and Middle Eastern politics:   “Con la literatura busco mis raíces, investigo nuestra milenaria cultura e intento acercarla a las nuevas generaciones que arrastran un eslabón perdido de nuestra historia. En estos últimos años publiqué varios libros de poesía, relatos y presenté conferencias sobre la cultura saharaui en varias universidades de Estados Unidos , Italia, Canadá y España. Soy miembro fundador de la Generación de la Amistad Saharaui. Formo parte del Asociación de Antropología, de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Antropología en Acción. Desde 2010 soy Profesor Honorario en Antropología Social, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, UAM.” Descriptions of more of Bahia Awah’s published works can be found here.

Limam Boicha was born in the Western Sahara in 1972. He is a member of theGeneración de la Amistad[Generation of Friendship] a group of Saharawi poets who have tried to raise awareness of the condition of their people. Limam studied journalism in Cuba before returning to the refugee camps where he worked at the Saharawi National Radio Station. His work is receiving critical attention, though, beyond the borders of Spain and has appeared in English translation in England (Treinta y uno, Thirty one: a bilingual anthology of saharaui resistence poetry) and in the United States (Poems for the Millennium, Volume Four The University of California Book of North African Literature).  He has been included in two Saharawi poetry anthologies in Spanish:Añoranza [Longing] (2003) andBubisher. He has also published a collection of his ownLos versos de la madera[Verses of Wood] (2004). He lives in Madrid.

An Overview of Genocide in 1990s and Early 2000s AND The 1994 Genocide in Rwanda: A Case Study

Date:  April 19, 2014, 9:00am-3:00, 1210 Heller Hall, West Bank U of MN
Instructors: Samuel Totten  is one of the foremost scholars of curriculum on Holocaust and genocide education and has published several texts aiding educators integrate this into their curriculum.

Cost: $25 includes parking, resources, 6 CEUS, lunch and book by Samuel Totten

Registration deadline: April 5, 2014 Register Here

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:If you need to cancel, write to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by April 5, 2014. If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

In this educator workshop, visiting scholar Samuel Totten will begin by discussing the origins, causes and responses to genocide within the scope of human rights and international law. He will then give an overview and summary of genocides perpetuated in Africa and beyond in the 1990s including the Nuba Mountains; Srebenica; and Darfur before examining in depth, as a case study, the 1994 Genocide of Rwanda. Totten will finish by addressing the latest outbreaks of violence in the world, which crimes against humanity have been perpetuated, and noting where there is a fear of genocide breaking out.

Participants of this workshop will receive resouces and materials to develop curriculum to integrate into their classrooms. This workshop will address the 2011 Minnesota Academic Standards for Social Studies.

Institute for Global Studies Summer 2014 Institutes for Educators

Registration this year will require immediate online payment. There are a limited number of Travel Scholarships available for those educators coming from outside the Twin Cities metro area. (No travel scholarships available for Indigenous Film institute as it takes place in Walker, Minnesota.) Please email outreach@umn.edu if interested in one of the Travel Scholarships.

Register here for all summer institutes and optional housing.

Capturing Stories of Diasporas through Digital Storytelling

June 16-19, 2014, 9:00am-4:00 pm, Room 614 Social Sciences, West Bank U of MN
Registration deadline: June 2, 2014

Register Here

Digital stories are first-person narratives and multimedia presentations that combine digitized still images, video clips, voiceover narration and music. Creators of digital stories make sense of the world through inquiry, self-reflection and perspective-taking.  In this workshop, participants will learn about global migration patterns of people in Europe, Asia, Africa, North America and South America as well as develop technical skills necessary to create a digital story.  The purpose of this workshop is to give educators skills necessary for them to help students in their classroom tell stories of migration and to help students achieve the following global competencies as defined by the US Department of Education:

  • Students investigate the world beyond their immediate environment by identifying an issue, generating questions, and explaining significance.
  • Students recognize their own and others’ perspectives by explaining the impact of cultural interaction.
  • Students communicate their ideas effectively with diverse audiences by selecting and using appropriate technology and media to communicate with diverse audiences.
  • Students translate their ideas into appropriate actions to improve conditions by acting personally or collaboratively in creative and ethical ways to contribute to improvement and assess impact of actions taken.

Educators should come to the institute with a 300-500 word narrative about their own personal or family history immigrant experience OR a narrative about their experience working with people in immigrant or refugee communities.

Instructors: Immigration History Research Center staff, more TBA

Cost: $100 includes all parking, materials, fieldtrips and lunches
CEUs: 30
Optional on campus housing available for $300

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:  If you need to cancel your registration, a refund minus $20 will be issued to you if you cancel in writing to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by June 2, 2014.  If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.


Sponsors: Institute for Global Studies, European Studies Consortium, African Studies Initiative, Consortium for Study of Asias, Immigration History Research Center, Gender Women & Sexuality Studies

Global Business of Food
Global Business Summer Institute for Teachers

Dates: June 23-26, 2014, 9:00 am-4:00 pm, Carlson School of Management
Registration deadline: June 9, 2014

Register Here

Calling all business, social studies, and economics educators!

Participants in this workshop will:

  • Learn about macroeconomic issues affecting food and agricultural trade
  • Examine issues of sustainability in global food supply chains
  • Investigate how food companies market to customers around the world
  • Hear from local food companies about their global strategy

This workshop includes class sessions, case studies, and discussions with companies like Hormel, International Dairy Queen and Seneca Foods.

Instructors:

  • Tim Smith, Associate Professor, Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering and
    Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management
  • Carlos Torelli, Associate Professor, Carlson School Department of Marketing
  • Seth Werner, Senior Lecturer, Carlson School Department of Marketing

Sponsors Center for International Business Education and Research(CIBER), Institute for Global Studies UMN

Cost: $100 includes all, materials, fieldtrips and lunches

Minnesota State Academic Standards as they relate to Global Dimensions of the Food Industry

This institute will address the following standards and/ or benchmarks from the MN Social Studies Standards 2011. First number indicates grade level; 9 represents 9th-12th grades.

  • 6.2.3.5 Standard: Individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons, interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource
  • 7.2.4.5 Standard: Individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways for different reasons. Interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determine the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service or resource.
  • 8.2.1.1 Standard: People make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering short and long run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis
  • 9.2.1.1Standard: People make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering short and long run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis
  • 9.2.4.5 Standard: Individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services and resources in different ways and for different reasons. Interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determine the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service or resource.
  • 9.2.4.7 Standard: resource markets and financial markets determine wages, interest rates and commodity prices
  • 9.2.5.12 Standard: International trade, exchange rates and international institutions affect individuals, organizations, and governments throughout the worlds


CEUs: 30
Optional on campus housing available for $300

CANCELLATION DEADLINE: If you need to cancel your registration, a refund minus $20 will be issued to you if you cancel in writing to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by June 9, 2014. If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

Sponsors: Center for International Business Education and Research, Institute for Global Studies, European Studies Consortium, African Studies Initiative, Consortium for Study of Asias

Teaching Global Indigenous Issues through Film: Healthy Societies, with an emphasis on Indigenous Films of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

July 7-10, 2014 9:00am-4:00 pm, with optional evening activities TBA

To be held at Northern Lights Conference Center, Walker, Minnesota (attendees are responsible for making their own lodging arrangements.) Reserve room here.
Registration deadline: June 23, 2014

OPTIONAL GRADUATE CREDIT (2 credits) available for this instiute

Register Here

In this institute, we’re trying to accomplish many and complex goals. We want to reach educators who use Indigenous films in the classroom by networking with others who have similar tasks. We want to share in the experiences of the makers of these moving images. And we also want to inspire the young to continue making moving images because, more so now than ever before, these images have become our means of engaging with the world. Educators from all disciplines welcome. Through listening to presentations, viewing films, and participating in discussions, educators in this weeklong institute will have the opportunity to examine core themes that are essential to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous cultures, both globally and locally, in the following ways:

  1. Participants will develop a deeper historical perspective of Spanish, French and British colonialism, its impact on peoplehood, and the necessity of decolonization in order to achieve a healthy society.
  2. Participants will be exposed to the global contours and contexts of treaty rights, and will be able to distinguish between issues of tribal sovereignty versus autonomy in several Indigenous cultures.
  3. Participants will develop a deeper understanding of the Media’s role in constructing Indigenous sovereignty.
  4. Participants will gain increased appreciation about how language is intrinsically tied to the culture of a people, and how the success of language revitalization programs, both locally and globally, increase the overall health and wellbeing of indigenous societies.
  5. Participants will both receive and develop curricular resources in order to be more successful at integrating a global perspective of Indigenous identity into the classroom.

There will also be special screenings, in partnership with Minnesota Department of Education and the Native Youth Alliance, of youth Indigenous Films.

Presenters in order of presentations:

KEYNOTE: Shelley Niro , Multidisciplinary artist Shelley Niro (1954 – ) is from the Mohawk Nation of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy) and is a member of the Turtle Clan from the Oshwekon, Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Niro’s practice as a painter, photographer, sculptor and filmmaker has garnered acclaim and accolades at many levels. Her contemporary Indigenous perspective is based upon traditional knowledge; her sense of community and colonial critique re-contextualized through matriarchal wisdom, metaphor, masquerade and related expressions of sovereignty.

Dr. Anthony Adah, Minnesota State University Moorhead (institute lead)

Dr. M. Elise Marubbio, Augsburg College

Dr. Joseph Bauerkemper, University of Minnesota,  Duluth

Dr. Anton Treuer, American Indian Resource Center, Bemidji State University

Dr. Katie Johnston-Goodstar, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Dr. Carter Meland, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Nicole Buckanaga, Leech Lake Tribal College

Leslie Harper, Bug oh Nay Ge Shig School, Niigaane Immersion

Dr. James Knutson-Kolodzne, American Indian Center, St Cloud State University

Cost: $100 includes all parking, materials, fieldtrips and lunches
CEUs: 30

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:  If you need to cancel your registration, a refund minus $20 will be issued to you if you cancel in writing to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by June 23, 2014.  If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

Sponsors:Institute for Global Studies, European Studies Consortium

Food! in the Global Classroom

Dates: July 14-17, 2014, 9:00am-4:00 pm, R-380 Learning and Environmental Sciences, St Paul Campus
Registration deadline: June 30, 2014

Register Here

Food is essential to our health and wellbeing.  One of the pressing questions of our time is how do we feed the world and sustain our planet? How do we integrate food into all disciplines in our schools and educate our students to be future problem solvers of these global concerns?   From Europe to the Americas, from Africa to Asia, these topics are becoming increasingly important.  In this institute, educators will examine issues of food sustainability, food justice, food as a part of the international human rights declaration, food affordability, international food protection policy, as well as address how to use food to teach about cultures all over the world.   We will examine these global issues of food in local context by making site visits to both urban and rural farms before enjoying an international cooking night in a kitchen housed in a global market.  We will also be visiting the Flavor Education and Research Center at the University of Minnesota. The purpose of this institute is to give educators knowledge and resources through interdisciplinary studies about food issues to bring back to their classrooms so their students can become globally competent as defined by the U.S. Department of Education:

  • Students investigate the world beyond their immediate environment by identifying an issue, generating questions, and explaining significance.
  • Students recognize their own and others’ perspectives by articulating how differential access to knowledge, technology and resources affects quality of life and perspectives.
  • Students communicate their ideas effectively with diverse audiences by recognizing and expressing how diverse audiences perceive meaning and how that affects communication.
  • Students translate their ideas into appropriate actions to improve conditions by reflecting on capacity to advocate for and contribute to improvement

Instructors:

Barrett Colombo, Institute onthe Environment, U of MN

Kris Igo, Food Science and Nutrition, U of MN

Uli Koester, Midwest Food Connection

Neal Frederickson, National Center for Food Protection and Defense, U of MN

 

Cost: $100 includes all parking, materials, fieldtrips and lunches
CEUs: 30
Optional on campus housing available for $300

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:  If you need to cancel your registration, a refund minus $20 will be issued to you if you cancel in writing to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by June 30, 2014.  If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

Sponsors: Institute for Global Studies, European Studies Consortium, African Studies Initiative, Consortium for Study of Asias

Mapping Identities: Integrating the Arts and Language Acquisition

Professional Development for Language Educators

July 21-24, 2014, 9:00am-4:00 pm, Room 614 Social Sciences, West Bank U of MN
Registration deadline: July 7, 2014

OPTIONAL GRADUATE CREDIT (2 credits) available for this instiute

Register Here

The arts touch upon every aspect of human life. The integration of the arts into the curriculum provides students with a rich entryway into a target language and culture.  Moreover, it is also a way of reflecting profoundly about one’s own culture or cultures. Students can be exposed to the vast array of meaningful artistic production in any given culture via the literary, performing, digital and visual arts.  Not only do students gain a heightened awareness of the culture or cultures in question via the arts, but also they are able to respond to the artistic production in meaningful ways via classroom assignments, activities, exercises and projects thus providing more reality-based topics of discussion.

Beyond engaging the arts as a powerful bridge to language acquisition and cultural comprehension, students themselves are invited to become artistic creators in the target language, or even in their own language as a means of deep exploration.  The language/literature/culture classroom therefore becomes a community of artistic creators engaged in both responding to existing artistic production from the cultures in question and relating to the target or native language and cultures via student production.

This Summer Institute will lead participants through this “experience” with a series of activities combining the performing, visual, and literary arts.  Particular attention will be paid to the performing arts as a means of embodying the target and/or native cultures in question. Participants will be given materials and models that can be applied to a number of fields within the K-12 curriculum and college-level for students of all  levels and ages.

We will work with the Performance Cycle, developed by Eileen Landay and Kurt Wootton and will engage in exercises, activities, and mini-projects that take us through the Performance Cycle.  We will be working with the themes of identity, home, belonging and displacement via texts and the arts. Please note that Performing Text can come about in a myriad of ways.  The idea is to have a final outcome and to honor the work everyone produces. No experience in the arts required.

Workshop will be conducted in English

Instructor:Dr Patricia Sobral, PhD Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies, Brown University

Cost: $100 includes all parking, materials, fieldtrips and lunches
Optional on campus housing available for $300
CEUs: 30

CANCELLATION DEADLINE:  If you need to cancel your registration, a refund minus $20 will be issued to you if you cancel in writing to Deborah Jane outreach@umn.edu by July 7, 2013.  If you cancel after this date, you will not be eligible for a refund.

Sponsors: European Studies Consortium